Food Quotes

 

Quotes about food and eating … quotes about ingesting things garlic, tomatoes, and animals … things like that.

A little garlic, judiciously used, won’t seriously affect your social life and will tone up more dull dishes than any commodity discovered to date.

— Alexander Wright, How to Live Without a Woman (1937)

Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French. Sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek. Soy sauce makes it Chinese; garlic makes it good.

— Alice May Brock

My final, considered judgment is that the hardy bulb [garlic] blesses and ennobles everything it touches – with the possible exception of ice cream and pie.

— Angelo Pellegrini, The Unprejudiced Palate (1948)

Garlic is divine. Few food items can taste so many distinct ways, handled correctly. Misuse of garlic is a crime…Please, treat your garlic with respect…Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don’t deserve to eat garlic

— Anthony Bourdain, Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly

“Are you a vegetarian?” I ask, based on the evidence in front of me.
She nods.
“Why?”
“Because I have this theory that when we die, every animal that we’ve eaten has a chance at eating us back. So if you’re a carnivore and you add up all the animals you’ve eaten–well, that’s a long time in purgatory, being chewed.”
“Really?”
She laughs. “No. I’m just sick of the question. I mean, I’m a vegetarian because I think it’s wrong to eat other sentient creatures. And it sucks for the environment.”

— David Levithan, Every Day

“What’s the problem Earthman?” said Zaphod, now transferring his attention to the animal’s enormous rump.
“I just don’t want to eat an animal that’s standing here inviting me to,” said Arthur, “it’s heartless.”
“Better than eating an animal that doesn’t want to be eaten,” said Zaphod.
“That’s not the point,” Arthur protested. Then he thought about it for a moment. “Alright,” he said, “maybe it is the point. I don’t care, I’m not going to think about it now. I’ll just … er …”

— Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

Another article of cuisine that offends the bowels of unused Britons is garlic. Not uncommonly in southern climes an egg with a shell on is the only procurable animal food without garlic in it. Flatulence and looseness are the frequent results.

— Dr. T. K. Chambers, A Manual of Diet In Health and Disease (1875)

Of the many smells of Athens two seem to me the most characteristic – that of garlic, bold and deadly like acetylene gas. and that of dust, soft and warm and caressing like tweed.

— Evelyn Waugh, When the Going was Good (1946)

There are many miracles in the world to be celebrated and, for me, garlic is the most deserving.

— Felice Leonardo Buscaglia (1924-1998)

To eat is a necessity, but to eat intelligently is an art.

— François La Rochefoucauld

Animals are my friends…and I don’t eat my friends.

— George Bernard Shaw

The hardest part of returning to a truly healthy environment may be changing the current totally unsustainable heavy-meat-eating culture of increasing numbers of people around the world. But we must try. We must make a start, one by one.

— Jane Goodall, Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating

My plat de resistance is potato salad with garlic and olive oil which we press from the olives from my trees in the grounds of my home near St Remy de Provence. I have four hectares and take the olives down to the local community press at Maussane les Alpilles. I don’t produce big quantities; it is just for the family and friends.

— Jean Reno, Actor

Just how destructive does a culinary preference have to be before we decide to eat something else? If contributing to the suffering of billions of animals that live miserable lives and (quite often) die in horrific ways isn’t motivating, what would be? If being the number one contributor to the most serious threat facing the planet (global warming) isn’t enough, what is? And if you are tempted to put off these questions of conscience, to say not now, then when?

— Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

Not responding is a response–we are equally responsible for what we don’t do. In the case of animal slaughter, to throw your hands in the air is to wrap your fingers around a knife handle.

— Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

I love sushi, I love fried chicken, I love steak. But there is a limit to my love,

— Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

Isn’t it strange how upset people get about a few dozen baseball players taking growth hormones, when we’re doing what were doing to our food animals and feeding them to our children?

— Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

Oh, that miracle clove! Not only does garlic taste good, it cures baldness and tennis elbow, too.

— Laurie Burrows Grad

A man can live and be healthy without killing animals for food; therefore, if he eats meat, he participates in taking animal life merely for the sake of his appetite. And to act so is immoral

— Leo Tolstoy

Without garlic I simply would not care to live.

— Louis Diat (1885-1958)

The symbolism of meat-eating is never neutral. To himself, the meat-eater seems to be eating life. To the vegetarian, he seems to be eating death. There is a kind of gestalt-shift between the two positions which makes it hard to change, and hard to raise questions on the matter at all without becoming embattled.

— Mary Midgley, Animals and Why They Matter

It is absurd that we eat pigs and love dogs and don’t even know why. Many of us spend long minutes in the aisle of the drugstore mulling over what toothpaste to buy. Yet most of don’t spend any time at all thinking about what species of animal we eat and why. Our choices as consumers drive an industry that kills ten billion animals per year in the United States alone. If we choose to support this industry and the best reason we can come up with is because it’s the way things are, clearly something is amiss.

— Melanie Joy, Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows

Were the walls of our meat industry to become transparent, literally or even figuratively, we would not long continue to raise, kill, and eat animals the way we do.

— Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

You can never have enough garlic. With enough garlic, you can eat The New York Times.

— Morley Safer

Garlic used as it should be used is the soul, the divine essence, of cookery. The cook who can employ it successfully will be found to possess the delicacy of perception, the accuracy of judgment, and the dexterity of hand which go to the formation of a great artist.

— Mrs. W. G. Waters, The Cook’s Decameron (1920)

We have the whitest kitchens and the most shining bathrooms in the world. But in the lovely white kitchen the average [person] can’t produce a meal fit to eat, and the lovely shining bathroom is mostly a receptacle for deodorants, laxatives, sleeping pills, and the products of that confidence racket called the cosmetic industry. We make the finest packages in the world, Mr Marlowe. The stuff inside is mostly junk.

— Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye

I have read in one of the Marseille newspapers that if certain people find aioli indigestible, it is simply because too little garlic has been included in its confection, a minimum of four cloves per person being necessary.

— Richard Olney, Simple French Food (1974)

I felt my heart crack slowly like a pomegranate, spilling its seeds.

— Trebor Healey, A Horse Named Sorrow
 Posted by on June 26, 2014