Nature Quotes

 

Quotes about nature and the world: beauty, serenity, trees, mountains, rivers …

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. 

— Albert Einstein

Nature is man’s teacher.  She unfolds her treasures to his search, unseals his eye, illumes his mind, and purifies his heart; an influence breathes from all the sights and sounds of her existence. 

— Alfred Billings Street

After all, I don’t see why I am always asking for private, individual, selfish miracles when every year there are miracles like white dogwood. 

— Anne Morrow Lindbergh

If you wish to know the divine, feel the wind on your face and the warm sun on your hand.

— Buddha

If the sight of the blue skies fills you with joy, if a blade of grass springing up in the fields has power to move you, if the simple things of nature have a message that you understand, rejoice, for your soul is alive. 

— Eleonora Duse

The best friend on earth of man is the tree: When we use the tree respectfully and economically, we have one of the greatest resources of the earth.

— Frank Lloyd Wright

The sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do. 

— Galileo

There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more.

— George Gordon, Lord Byron, Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage

What would the world be, once bereft
Of wet and of wildness? Let them be left,
O let them be left, wildness and wet;
Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet.

— Gerard Hopkins

Once you have heard the lark, known the swish of feet through hill-top grass and smelt the earth made ready for the seed, you are never again going to be fully happy about the cities and towns that man carries like a crippling weight upon his back. 

— Gwyn Thomas

You can’t be suspicious of a tree, or accuse a bird or a squirrel of subversion or challenge the ideology of a violet. 

— Hal Borland, Sundial of the Seasons, 1964

I believe that there is a subtle magnetism in Nature, which, if we unconsciously yield to it, will direct us aright.

— Henry David Thoreau

Shall I not have intelligence with the earth?  Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mould myself. 

— Henry David Thoreau

Each generation takes the earth as trustees. We ought to bequeath to posterity as many forests and orchards as we have exhausted and consumed.

— J. Sterling Morton

Good heavens, of what uncostly material is our earthly happiness composed… if we only knew it.  What incomes have we not had from a flower, and how unfailing are the dividends of the seasons. 

— James Russell Lowell

The poetry of the earth is never dead. 

— John Keats

Earth and sky, woods and fields, lakes and rivers, the mountain and the sea, are excellent schoolmasters, and teach some of us more than we can ever learn from books. 

— John Lubbock

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.  Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.  The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.

— John Muir

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul.

— John Muir

Never does nature say one thing and wisdom another. 

— Juvenal, Satires

Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair. 

— Kahlil Gibran

My heart that was rapt away by the wild cherry blossoms – will it return to my body when they scatter? 

— Kotomichi

The foot that is familiar with the grass belongs usually to a man of lighter heart than he whose soles seldom wander from the pavement; and the best elixir vitæ is a run, as often as we can contrive it, amid the sweets of new and lovely scenery, where nature sits, fresh from the hand of the Creator, almost chiding us for our delay.

— Leo Hartley Grindon, “Insects,” The Little Things of Nature: Considered Especially in Relation to the Divine Benevolence, 1865

A wise man can do no better than to turn from the churches and look up through the airy majesty of the wayside trees with exultation, with resignation, at the unconquerable unimplicated sun. 

— Llewelyn Powys

The dance of the palm trees, the oceans calling, the first rays of sun and heaven is here. 

— Mike Dolan

And I learned what is obvious to a child. That life is simply a collection of little lives, each lived one day at a time. That each day should be spent finding beauty in flowers and poetry and talking to animals. That a day spent with dreaming and sunsets and refreshing breezes cannot be bettered.

— Nicholas Sparks

Look at the trees, look at the birds, look at the clouds, look at the stars… and if you have eyes you will be able to see that the whole existence is joyful.  Everything is simply happy.  Trees are happy for no reason; they are not going to become prime ministers or presidents and they are not going to become rich and they will never have any bank balance.  Look at the flowers – for no reason.  It is simply unbelievable how happy flowers are. 

— Osho

How cunningly nature hides every wrinkle of her inconceivable antiquity under roses and violets and morning dew! 

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

Breathless, we flung us on a windy hill,
Laughed in the sun, and kissed the lovely grass.

— Rupert Brooke

As you sit on the hillside, or lie prone under the trees of the forest, or sprawl wet-legged by a mountain stream, the great door, that does not look like a door, opens. 

— Stephen Graham, The Gentle Art of Tramping

As a child, one has that magical capacity to move among the many eras of the earth; to see the land as an animal does; to experience the sky from the perspective of a flower or a bee; to feel the earth quiver and breathe beneath us; to know a hundred different smells of mud and listen unself- consciously to the soughing of the trees.

— Valerie Andrews, A Passion for this Earth

I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars.

— Walt Whitman

Great things are done when men and mountains meet.  This is not done by jostling in the street. 

— William Blake

And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything. 

— William Shakespeare
 Posted by on December 2, 2012